© 2019 by Rasha Shaker

  • Rasha Shaker

Inbox Assault Should Be A Crime


Yes, these were all from the same person/company.

I like receiving newsletters, especially if they're prevalent in my field. I signed up for a few recently and a few days later, I dropped them. Why? For one simple reason.


The most notable one I signed up for was from a well-known female entrepreneur company, and they were offering a free webinar. The webinar was insightful, and like many of their kind, they were promoting an offer for a coaching package. Very much out of my budget I humbly declined after the webinar was over and went about my day. Moments later, I started to see the assault on my inbox. I assume several of the emails I got were A/B testing on the offer they just had in the webinar. At this point, it was more like A/Z testing and it was irking, to say the least. Take a look above, and you'll see that I got six emails on November 20. Six! I'm surprised that they weren't flagged as spam at this point.


So, I went to the footer of one of those emails and unsubscribed. To my bewilderment, I was STILL getting emails! To say the least, this left a sour taste in my mouth. A few others that I signed up for assaulted my inbox, but none to this degree. Why is this necessary? I'm curious to see their mailing list and what happens when the inbox assaults go out. Do they drop? Stay the same? I'd really love to know.


For the newsletter I write for my full-time job, it goes out monthly with engagement and the click-through rate relatively high. For shows we are promoting, we maybe send out 2-3 emails throughout the life of the show's onsale, but those are to a targeted list who showed interested in our shows. For both instances, the drop out rate is very low.


Email marketing is perhaps the strongest tool we have as marketers. It's a guaranteed reach to our audience who genuinely wants to know more about our product, service, etc. When we take that interest too lightly and start clogging their inboxes with junk, then we shouldn't be surprised if people start jumping off the ship. We need to find that balance between informing, enticing, and annoying our audiences.